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Clémence von Mueffling Shares Her Best Beauty Secrets

By Suzanne Charlé | July 2, 2018 | People

Clémence von Mueffling's beauty secrets are out of the bag and onto bookstore shelves.

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Clémence von Mueffling has always lived in the world of beauté. Both her mother and grandmother were beauty editors at French Vogue. In fact, her grandmother, Régine, was a model of photographer Irving Penn. It’s no wonder, then, that after working in the industry herself, the 39-year-old decided to write Ageless Beauty the French Way ($25.99, St. Martin’s Press), a tome on getting older in that je ne sais quoi kind of way.

Sharing information from her family and experts like the world-renowned hairstylist David Mallett, Parisian skin expert Joëlle Ciocco and skincare guru Isabelle Bellis, von Mueffling passes on beauty secrets for women at every stage of life. “It’s important to buy the best hairbrush,” stresses von Mueffling. “It’s an investment that will last for years and years.” Every woman in her family, from her 88-year-old grandmother to her young daughter, has a Mason Pearson brush. Other tricks require time. She enhances her skin’s well-being by massaging her face and decollete with oil two times a week. French women, she says, take care of their skin from a very young age. “You need to treat your skin like a favorite silk blouse... Never overscrub!“

American women, on one hand, tend to look for perfection, in their hair, skin and dress, von Mueffling declares. “[But] French women are not afraid to show their true selves—they play with what nature gave them and make the most of it, turning a difference into an asset that may even get better with age!” One perfect example of this, von Mueffling notes, is the très chic first lady of France, Brigitte Macron. “She embodies the idea of working with what you’ve got,” von Mueffling says, stating that Macron swaps expected fashion choices for clothing and makeup that suits her. “It is about finding that balance that makes us happy in life. We have to learn to treat ourselves kindly.”



Photography by: Photo by Pamela Berkovic